The Age of Fission with Lonnie Clark, guest Hervé Courtois 2-16-2017

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Lonnie Clark interview with guest Hervé Courtois

Herve discusses how Japanese scientists are manipulated to not report on radiation problems in Japan. Herve also mentions the connection between the civil nuclear and military programs. Lonnie mentions how the new USA administration is lining up with Japan for nuclear and military business.

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Posted to nuclear-news.net

16 February 2017

Transcribed by Shaun McGee

Our very own contributor to Nuclear-news.net Herve Courtois makes a rare interview with Lonnie Clark. He is our Fukushima correspondent who has family in Fukushima.

He is based in France. Known as a balanced news source for Fukushima information he created Fukushima 311 Watchdogs and Rainbow Warriors on Facebook. He has a WordPress blog called Fukushima 311 Watchdogs, and is one of the 3 co-editors on Nuclear News.

Herve talks about the need for caution on reporting on Fukushima and nuclear stories that might damage a bloggers credibility in…

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Taiwan – ‘Nuclear Go Zero’ parades set to take place March 11 2017 nationwide

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2017/02/13 15:41:16

Taipei, Feb. 13 (CNA) Nuclear-free advocates around Taiwan have organized three parades through the online “Nuclear Go Zero” action platform, in a national protest action set for March 11 in Taipei, Kaohsiung and Taitung simultaneously.

The parades will take place on Ketagalan Boulevard in Taipei, the Labor Park in Kaohsiung, and the Tiehua Pedestrian Zone in Taitung, with the theme of “Zero Nuclear, Low Carbon, Sustainable Energy,” the organizers said Monday.

The government will be urged to accelerate efforts to realize its campaign promise to replace existing energy sources with green ones, to decommission three operating nuclear power plants as scheduled, and to find the best solution for the disposal of nuclear waste, the organizers said.

This year, they will also demand that the government resolve problems relating to carbon emissions and air pollution. “The government should accelerate its steps, and come up with concrete plans and schedules…

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Fukushima Blues – Is Thyroid Cancer good for you and does it help if you smile?

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JAPAN-QUAKE-DISASTER-NUCLEAR-ACCIDENT
Posted to nuclear-news.net
By Shaun McGee
Dated 9 February 2017
There is a campaign in Japan to expand the thyroid tests on downwind victims from the Fukushima nuclear disaster of march 2011. At the same time there is another campaign on behalf of the pro nuclear lobby to reduce the existing tests The background to this situation is described in detail on these links;
You will notice that on the corruption link a post at the bottom of the article from NHK [Fund to help young people with thyroid cancer NHK Japan; 27 Dec 2016] which states that at least one childs thyroid cancer had spread to the lungs because the thyroid cancer had not been dealt with quickly enough. This article has now been taken down (the link is on the corruption post for you to try) in a bid (I claim) to play down the possible…

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Japan’s ‘Unresolved’ Disaster Sways Symbol of Nuclear Opposition

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Japanese Government hides contamination from Fukushima nuclear disaster while sending evacuees home

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2017年1月中には、春頃の帰還が決まる冨岡町の市街地。地表面は7μSv/h超え‼
こんなところに帰還、バカじゃないの‼

Oz Yo
In January 2017, the urban district of tomioka-Cho, which was on the end of the spring. The surface of the ground is 7 Μsv / h.
I don’t know what you’re talking about?
On March 25, 2013, the nuclear evacuation zone in Tomioka was lifted by the central government, and the town was re-zoned into three areas according to different levels of radiation. However, the town government elected to keep the evacuation in place for at least another four years due to the need to rebuild damaged infrastructure

Tomioka was severely affected by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, and the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Besides sustaining considerable damage from the earthquake, and the tsunami (which devastated the coastal area), the town was evacuated en masse on the morning of March 12 as it is located well within the 20 kilometer…

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Tepco, investors discussing first bond sale since Fukushima anonymously shh!

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With the government considering splitting Tepco’s nuclear business and forming alliances with other atomic operators, the issue of restarting the utility’s Kashiwazaki Kariwa nuclear plant, the world’s biggest, has faded.
While oil and gas prices have risen in recent weeks, they are still well below highs in the aftermath of the nuclear disaster that led to a shutdown of most of Japan’s reactors, so Tepco’s costs remain manageable.
Tepco is aiming to sell the debt through a unit in charge of its power transmission business, Tepco Power Grid Inc, to separate risks from operations dealing with the disaster.

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THE HANS INDIA |   Dec 27,2016 , 05:40 PM IST

Tepco, investors discussing first bond sale since Fukushima Tepco, investors discussing first bond sale since Fukushima
Tokyo Electric Power (Tepco) is gauging demand for its first bond offering since the 2011 Fukushima nuclear calamity, with some market participants expecting a…

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Svetlana Alexievich, a Voice for People’s Suffering

Svetlana Alexievich, a Belarusian writer who won a Nobel Prize for her book on the Chernobyl nuclear disaster, visited evacuees in Fukushima Prefecture recently to hear about their experiences.

Alexievich was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2015 for her writing about human suffering through the testimonies of witnesses of the Chernobyl disaster. She has been highly praised for her oral history of that event.

Alexievich was invited to speak at a university in Tokyo.

“It may be impossible to stop nuclear power plants right away, but it’s important to consider what you can and should do,” she said at the event.

Alexievich’s books are written collages of testimonies by ordinary people. Her book, “Chernobyl Prayer: A Chronicle of the Future,” published in 1997, is representative of her work. It’s a collection of statements from the victims of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster 30 years ago in the former Soviet Union.

About a quarter of the land in Alexievich’s home country of Belarus was contaminated and seriously damaged by radioactive material. Even now, many former residents are not allowed to return to their hometowns.

Alexievich spent more than 10 years interviewing over 300 people, sometimes on camera.

“In the last few days, whenever I lifted my husband’s body, his skin would peel off and stick to my hand,” the wife of one firefighter told her.

She then wrote about their deep shock and continual sadness.

The Nobel Committee described her work as “polyphonic writings, a monument to suffering and courage in our time.”

“I try to listen to people no one sees or hears,” Alexievich says. “There’s much more power in their emotions than in economic or medical data…. So I think it’s important to remember their lives.”

Alexievich came to Japan to hear what people in Fukushima prefecture have to say, and visited temporary housing to listen to residents’ stories.

She met with a former resident of Iitate village, a town that’s still under an evacuation order.

“I was a dairy farmer in Iitate, but now I’m unemployed,” Kenichi Hasegawa told her.

Before the earthquake, he had about 50 cows, and was living with 7 members of his family that spanned 4 generations. Hasegawa drove Alexievich to his former home, which still stands empty.

After the accident, all of his cows had to be put down or let go. Unable to continue dairy farming due to radiation, Hasegawa decided to demolish the cow shed. His family is now scattered.

“Wasn’t it difficult to leave home?” Alexievich asked him.

Yes, it was… We can’t live the way we did before the accident, because of the radiation,” Hasegawa said.

Government officials say the evacuation order on Iitate will be lifted next March, but Hasegawa is anxious about the future.

“They say we’ll be able to return home, but haven’t mentioned their plans for the village after that,” he says. “My children won’t be returning.”

“In Fukushima, I saw the exact same situation I’d seen in Chernobyl. The destroyed homes, the empty villages and cities, the victims’ despair — they’re all the same,” Alexievich said. “In both countries, governments rushed to develop new technology, but they weren’t able to fulfill their responsibilities. They were irresponsible toward ‘the ordinary people.’”

Alexievich was also told the story of a dairy farmer who committed suicide. A close friend of the farmer took her to the place where he died.

“He left a note saying, ‘I wish there’d been no nuclear power plants here,'” Hasegawa said.

Alexievich has spent years focusing on the suffering of ordinary people and making their voices heard. Visiting the 2 disaster-stricken regions has renewed her sense of determination.

“No one completely understands the horror of nuclear power. Literature should communicate it, and so should philosophers. It’s not a job for politicians alone,” Alexievich said. “In other words, we need to look at what happened in Chernobyl and Fukushima and put them together, to form new knowledge…. I saw the future, not the past, and we need to work on that future.”

It has been 30 years since the nuclear disaster in Chernobyl, and 5 years since the one in Fukushima. The future depends on never letting the voices of “the ordinary people” go unheard — that’s the message from Nobel laureate Svetlana Alexievich.

http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/newsroomtokyo/aired/20161208.html

8-dec-2016