Edward Snowden discusses Japanese Government surveillance findings

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Repost from November 2017

In a recent interview with Edward Snowden in Japan he discussed the implications of the Japanese Secrets Act of 2013 (that was used to stop any information from whistleblowers concerning the Fukushima nuclear disaster).

The interview is 1 hour long and during the session he described how Japan had to enact the Secrets Act legislation for them to be able to access the 5 Eyes surveillance network. He explains that Japan will only be a 2nd tier partner because only white privileged countries (like the UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and of course the USA) can be part of the 1st Tier partners.

The UK enacted a similar Secrets Act in April 2014 that would make nuclear information “Official Sensitive”, meaning that this data would not be available to the media and civil society groups. The UK also added that nuclear and health data from both public and private companies would have this type of information censored from before the Act was made law.

During the 2012 Olympics in the UK civil society groups were targeted by police and the security services and this damaged the confidence in the public to voice opposition and largely continues up to today with new anti extremist laws being used against activists.

Two recent cases of abuse by the state have come to my notice concerning stakeholder groups in the UK. I was informed that Richard Bramhall has been having serious problems with both his emails disappearing and data being removed from the Low Level Radiation Campaign website. Prof Chris Busby, in a recent interview, explained how he was chased around a Swedish airport by a London based man with no luggage whilst heading towards a UK based government meeting (The Minister who was supposed to show up did not).  I have experienced CND UK main offices having their phones blocked (2015) in strange ways and I also have many experiences of hacking and overt operations against me (I had to leave the UK in the end).

The full interview explaining why these surveillance systems are bad for Japans democracy and legal system. There are Japanese subtitles and the audio is in English.

http://www.ourplanet-tv.org/?q=node/2184

 

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Edward Snowden discusses Japanese Government surveillance findings

screenshot-from-2017-11-10-163405
The interview is 1 hour long and during the session he described how Japan had to enact the Secrets Act legislation for them to be able to access the 5 Eyes surveillance network. He explains that Japan will only be a 2nd tier partner because only white privileged countries (like the UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and of course the USA) can be part of the 1st Tier partners.
The UK enacted a similar Secrets Act in April 2014 that would make nuclear information “Official Sensitive”, meaning that this data would not be available to the media and civil society groups. The UK also added that nuclear and health data from both public and private companies would have this type of information censored from before the Act was made law.
During the 2012 Olympics in the UK civil society groups were targeted by police and the security services and this damaged the confidence in the public to voice opposition and largely continues up to today with new anti extremist laws being used against activists.
Two recent cases of abuse by the state have come to my notice concerning stakeholder groups in the UK. I was informed that Richard Bramhall has been having serious problems with both his emails disappearing and data being removed from the Low Level Radiation Campaign website. Prof Chris Busby, in a recent interview, explained how he was chased around a Swedish airport by a London based man with no luggage whilst heading towards a UK based government meeting (The Minister who was supposed to show up did not).  I have experienced CND UK main offices having their phones blocked (2015) in strange ways and I also have many experiences of hacking and overt operations against me (I had to leave the UK in the end).
The full interview explaining why these surveillance systems are bad for Japans democracy and legal system.
There are Japanese subtitles and the audio is in English:
JCLU創立70周年記念シンポジウム「デジタル時代の監視とプライバシー」の第1部。アメリカ国家安全保障局 (NSA) および中央情報局 (CIA) の元局員・エドワード・スノーデン氏のライブインタビューノーカット版。
詳細はこちら http://www.ourplanet-tv.org/?q=node/2184

Controversial conspiracy bill approved by Abe Cabinet

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Protesters stage a rally in front of the prime minister’s office in Tokyo on Tuesday as Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s Cabinet approved an anti-conspiracy bill

The Cabinet of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe approved Tuesday a controversial bill that would revise the organized crime law so authorities can crack down on individuals and organizations who conspire to engage in serious criminal activity.

The conspiracy charges apply to groups of two or more people, where at least one person procures funds, supplies or surveys a location in preparation for committing a crime. Efforts to maintain or expand organized crime groups would also be punished, while reduced penalties would be considered for those who turn themselves in before a crime is carried out.

The government is pushing to enact the revised bill during the ordinary Diet session through mid-June, but strong objections by opposition parties are expected amid concern that the law may be used against civic groups.

The backlash against the measure has been a persistent hurdle in passing the anti-conspiracy law, which the government has attempted and failed to enact three times in the past, as it targeted “groups” in general.

The bill needs to be passed to ensure necessary counterterrorism measures are in place before the upcoming 2020 Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, according to the government. It is also a prerequisite to ratify the U.N. Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, which was adopted by member states in 2000 and took effect in 2003.

It is an urgent necessity for the government to ratify the treaty to promote international cooperation on counter-terrorism,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga told a news conference Tuesday, adding Japan is the only country among the Group of Seven nations that has not signed the treaty.

Suga also said the targets of the new bill would be strictly applied to terrorists and other organized crime syndicates, not ordinary citizens.

Some opposition parties and the Tokyo Bar Association denounced the revisions, which they say would still allow the possibility of government overreach and retaliation against civic groups.

The conspiracy bill goes against the basic principles of our country’s criminal code and the legal system,” Motoji Kobayashi, president of the Tokyo Bar Association, said in a statement in January. “It threatens the function of protecting human rights.”

The government previously included 676 crimes in its original draft, but has narrowed that number down to 277 in the revised bill.

Yukio Yamashita, an attorney and member of the association, warned that 277 crimes are still too many and noted some are unnecessary.

For example, a person using forged stamps or competing in a motor boat race without a license would be subject to punishment under the revised bill, Yamashita said in a seminar held earlier in March.

Meanwhile, the Japan Federation of Bar Associations claims that only a limited number of countries, such as Norway, have newly enacted anti-conspiracy laws for the purpose of ratifying the U.N. treaty, which was adopted to crack down on organized cross-border crimes such as human trafficking, narcotics trading and money laundering.

Japan’s Diet approved the treaty in 2013, but was unable to ratify it without a law covering criminal conspiracy.

As of December, 187 countries and regions have signed the treaty.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/03/21/national/crime-legal/controversial-conspiracy-bill-approved-by-abe-cabinet/#.WNJ_RKKmnIW

Japanese Govt. and TEPCO Found Liable by Court for Fukushima Disaster

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People pray for victims of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami near Tokyo Electric Power Co’s (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

Japan govt & Tokyo power firm liable for ‘preventable’ Fukushima meltdown – court

People pray for victims of the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami near Tokyo Electric Power Co’s (TEPCO) tsunami-crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant

Negligence by the government and Tokyo Electric Power (TEPCO) contributed to the Fukushima nuclear disaster in March 2011, a court in Japan has ruled, saying the catastrophe could have been avoided, and marking the first time the state has been held liable.

The district court in Maebashi, north of Tokyo, said the government and plant operator were to blame for failing to prepare anti-tsunami measures.

The judge awarded a total of 38.55 million yen (US$340,000) in damages to some 62 plaintiffs who evacuated to Gunma Prefecture after the disaster began to loom large at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant in March 2011, the Asahi Shimbun newspaper reported

A group of 137 plaintiffs had argued the authorities and TEPCO failed to prevent the triple meltdown at the plant, and demanded 11 million yen ($97,108) each in compensation, the newspaper said, adding that the court accepted most of the arguments about the dramatic lack of anti-tsunami measures.

The plaintiffs highlighted the fact that in May 2008, three years before the disaster, plant operator TEPCO received an estimate of a tsunami as high as 15.7 meters that could hit the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant, Asahi Shimbun reported. That apocalyptic forecast came true, with a wave around that height hitting the nuclear power plant in 2011, triggering the reactor meltdowns. A huge tsunami knocked out the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, spewing radiation and forcing 160,000 people to flee their homes.

If the utility had installed emergency diesel electric generators on higher ground, the measure could have prevented the nuclear disaster, the court ruled on Friday.

Citing a government estimate released in July 2002, the court said that “TEPCO was capable of foreseeing several months after (the estimate) that a large tsunami posed a risk to the facility and could possibly flood its premises and damage safety equipment, such as the backup power generators,” the Japan Times reported

Meanwhile, in its long-term estimate, unveiled in 2002, the government said that the probability of an earthquake striking in the Japan Trench off the coast of northeastern Japan, including the sea area off the Fukushima No. 1 plant, was “about 20 percent within 30 years,” the Asahi Shimbun paper said

The lawyers for the plaintiffs welcomed the Friday court ruling, saying “It was extremely significant that (a court) has acknowledged the responsibility of the state,” Kyodo news agency reported

Around 30 similar suits have been filed in at least 20 district courts across Japan, lawyers said.

However, Takehiro Matsuta, one of the plaintiffs who evacuated from the city of Koriyama in central Fukushima Prefecture, called the damages “disappointing.” His child, who was three years old at the time of the nuclear disaster, received no compensation whatsoever.

My wife and I are struggling every day, but it’s my child who suffers the most,” the 38-year-old father said, as cited by the Japan Times. 

The ruling was one big step for my family, for those who evacuated from Fukushima to Gunma, and for tens of thousands of earthquake victims nationwide,” he said.

Both the government and TEPCO argued that the long-term estimate and the May 2008 tsunami study were not credible enough, continuing to insist that the massive tsunami was unexpected.

Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga, the government’s top spokesman, told a press conference on Friday that the officials “will consider how to respond after carefully examining the ruling.”

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant suffered a blackout and subsequent failure of its cooling systems in March 2011, when it was hit by an earthquake and a killer tsunami that knocked out the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, spewing radiation and forcing 160,000 people to flee their homes. Three of the plant’s six reactors were hit by meltdowns, making the Fukushima nuclear disaster the worst since the Chernobyl catastrophe in 1986.

https://www.rt.com/news/381154-tepco-government-liable-fukushima/

 

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Supporters of plaintiffs seeking compensation for Fukushima evacuees unfurl banners in front of the Maebashi District Court in Gunma Prefecture announcing the court’s decision Friday.


In first, government and Tepco found liable for Fukushima disaster

Maebashi, Gunma Pref. – A court in Japan has ruled for the first time that the government and the operator of the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant were responsible for failing to take preventive measures against the March 11, 2011, quake-triggered tsunami that killed scores and forced tens of thousands from their homes.

Friday’s stunning ruling by the Maebashi District Court was the first to recognize negligence by the state and Tokyo Electric Power Co. Holdings Inc. It called the massive tsunami predictable and said the major nuclear disaster could have been avoided.

The district court ordered the two to pay damages totaling ¥38.55 million to 62 of 137 plaintiffs from 45 households located near the plant, which suffered a triple meltdown caused by the tsunami, awarding ¥70,000 to ¥3.5 million in compensation to each plaintiff.

The plaintiffs had demanded the state and Tepco pay compensation of ¥11 million each — a total of about ¥1.5 billion — over the loss of local infrastructure and psychological stress they were subjected to after being forced to relocate to unfamiliar surroundings.

Citing a government estimate released in July 2002, the court said in the ruling that “Tepco was capable of foreseeing several months after (the estimate) that a large tsunami posed a risk to the facility and could possibly flood its premises and damage safety equipment, such as the backup power generators.”

It pointed out that the state should have ordered Tepco to take bolstered preventive measures, and criticized the utility for prioritizing costs over safety.

Of the plaintiffs, 76 who lived in evacuation zones were forced to move, while another 61 evacuated voluntarily even though their houses were located outside evacuation zones. The ruling was the first of 30 similar class-action suits filed nationwide involving more than 10,000 plaintiffs.

About 80,000 citizens who had lived in Fukushima reportedly left the prefecture after the March 2011 disaster.

I believe that the ruling saying both the government and Tepco were equally responsible is an important judgment,” Katsuyoshi Suzuki, the lead lawyer for the defense said at a news conference following the ruling. “But thinking about the psychological distress (the plaintiffs faced) after being forced to evacuate from their homes, I think the amount is not enough.”

Takehiro Matsuta, 38, one of the plaintiffs who evacuated from the city of Koriyama, hailed the ruling, but called the damages “disappointing.”

The ruling was one big step for my family, for those who evacuated from Fukushima to Gunma, and for tens of thousands of earthquake victims nationwide,” he said.

But called the payout “disappointing,” as his child, who was 3 years old at the time of the nuclear disaster, was not granted compensation. “My wife and I are struggling everyday, but it’s my child who suffers the most.”

The group of lawyers for the plaintiffs, which have had suits filed since September 2011, claimed that the Fukushima disaster resulted in serious human rights violations by forcing victims to relocate after the crisis caused widespread environmental damage.

The plaintiffs argued that Tepco could have prevented the damage if it had implemented measures, including the building of breakwaters, based on its 2008 tsunami trial calculation that showed waves of over 10 meters could hit the Fukushima No. 1 plant.

Those calculations took into account the 2002 estimate by the government’s Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion, which concluded that there was a 20 percent chance of a magnitude-8 earthquake rocking areas off Fukushima within 30 years.

However, the government and Tepco have argued that the massive tsunami was unexpected, claiming that there were different opinions among scholars over the long-term evaluation. Both attacked the credibility of the study, calling it unscientific.

The government also objected to the ruling, saying that because it had no authority to force Tepco to take such preventive measures as argued by the plaintiffs, it bore no responsibility.

According to the defense, a number of other class suits are inching closer to rulings, with one in the city of Chiba scheduled for Sept. 22 and another in the city of Fukushima involving 4,000 plaintiffs expected by the year’s end.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/03/17/national/crime-legal/first-government-tepco-found-liable-fukushima-disaster/#.WMwqEqKmnIV

Govt. to keep control over TEPCO for longer period

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The Japanese government has decided to maintain control over the operator of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant for an extended period.

Officials made the decision due to rising costs from the recovery of the 2011 nuclear accident.

The government acquired a 50.1 percent stake in Tokyo Electric Power Company through a state-backed bailout fund after the accident. This put the utility under effective state control.

Under the current plan, the government was to gradually reduce its control after April by selling TEPCO stocks in phases, while monitoring the company’s management.

But the government estimates that it will cost a total of about 188 billion dollars to clean up the soil, pay compensation, and decommission reactors. That’s about twice as much as an earlier estimate.

The extension of state control over TEPCO means that the government has to give up the current plan to cover the clean-up cost of about 35 billion dollars by selling the utility’s shares.

The government is now considering listing a joint venture set up by TEPCO, and Chubu Electric Power Company, and selling its stocks. It is also looking into selling some shares of a TEPCO group company that operates a power transmission business.

The government intends to include these financial alternatives in the utility’s business plan which will be renewed for the first time in 3 years in spring.

https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/20170302_09/

Project Ethos Works with the Japanese Government on all Public Relations Propaganda

I am sharing here with you a sample of Japanese Government propaganda, a video about Fukushima, claiming that everything is now fine.

By watching this propaganda video, you can imagine, you will get an idea of the intensity of propaganda that the Japanese government is subjecting its people with, thru all the government controlled mainstream media, claiming that all is very safely and controlled for everyone’s safety  by a safety conscious government absolutely caring for its people safety. Nice, isn’t it?

Propaganda from PM Abe’s government  forcefully pushing innocent victims back to live in highly contaminated areas, trying to make believe all is ok just in time for the coming 2020 Olympics. Like when they previously sent children to clean off radiation off route 6 just for propaganda’s sake !

Amazing, Chernobyl is still horribly contaminated after over 30 years, but Fukushima radiation is the new self cleaning kind that just vanishes after 5 years?  And that while there are ongoing reactions that are still completely uncontained.

Well isn’t that special. What a load of crap ! How stupid do they think we are to buy this crap?

From what I’ve seen, people should not even be living in certain parts of Tokyo and its vicinity.

I despise with much passion all the ETHOS scoundrels and all those Japanese government criminals.  Shame on you. Your pride and your denial will be your downfall.

Long live Fukushima , Long live the Children of Fukushima!

 

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Japan’s Fukushima Prefecture has been making tremendous progress in its revitalization since the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake.

The area continues to undergo recovery efforts, residents are returning to their everyday lives, and food from Fukushima is being enjoyed all over Japan under strict safety regulations.

 

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The March 2011Great East Japan Earthquake caused an enormous tsunami that overwhelmed the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

A continuous water injection cooling system has now stabilized the plant’s reactors and reduced radiation emissions dramatically.

 

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Food grown in Fukushima…

 

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… is widely available and popular across Japan.

 

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All food produced in Fukushima must first pass a test for radiation to be sold on the market.

 

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The standards set by the Japanese government are much stricter than the international standards.

 

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Thanks to these rigorous safety standards, Fukushima rice is enjoyed throughout Japan.

 

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A joint research project was conducted in 2014 by high school students in Fukushima and overseas under the supervision of experts.

 

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The survey found that the radiation exposure levels of students in Fukushima were almost the same as in Europe.

 

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The total area of Fukushima prefecture subject to evacuation orders has been progressively reduced since 2014, as decontamination efforts have lowered radiation to safe levels,

 

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allowing people to return to their homes.

 

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A lot of work still has to be done before the area fully recovers,

 

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but every day we are making progress toward a brighter future.

 

Watch this new video to learn more:

 

Japan – The Government of Japan Facebook page

https://www.facebook.com/JapanGov/videos/1262473720476424/?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE

More Evacuees Sue Govt, TEPCO over Fukushima N-Accident

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Fukushima, Dec. 12 (Jiji Press)–A group of 295 people, mainly nuclear disaster evacuees, on Monday joined lawsuits against the Japanese government and Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings Inc. over the Mach 2011 meltdowns at TEPCO’s Fukushima No. 1 power plant.
Filing their suit with Fukushima District Court, the plaintiffs, many of whom were evacuees in and outside Fukushima Prefecture, demanded that the government and TEPCO pay compensation and restore conditions before the nuclear accident.
The group, made up of men and women from minors to 89 years old, said they were forced to evacuate and deprived of their peaceful lives because of the accident at the power plant in the northeastern Japan prefecture.
The team joined those who filed similar suits against the government and TEPCO in March 2013, raising the total number of plaintiffs to some 4,200.
At a news conference after the latest suit was filed, plaintiff Akemi Eda, who evacuated from the Fukushima Prefecture town of Namie, noted recent incidents in which children evacuated from the prefecture due to the accident have been bullied at schools.

http://jen.jiji.com/jc/eng?g=eco&k=2016121200599